UISP Power Smart Charging

Smart Charging is an algorithm-based feature that automatically sets the UISP Power (UISP-P) and UISP Power Pro (UISP-P-Pro) charge current based on their power budget and the voltage of connected batteries. Compared to fixed charging modes, Smart Charging ensures optimal power budget utilization and efficient charging.

Smart Charging Modes

There are two charging Smart Charging modes:

  • Charging: In this mode, the algorithm sets a lower charge current, requiring only 10-30W of the total power budget.
  • Fast Charging: In this mode, the algorithm sets a higher current as follows:
    • UISP-P: either 45W (when connected to a Li-ion battery) or 60W ( lead-acid battery) of the total power budget.
    • UISP-P-Pro: around 90W of the total power budget.

Power Budget Utilization

UISP-P

Three of the UISP-P’s outputs utilize its power budget: the DC output and its two battery chargers (Li-on, lead-acid). They are prioritized in that order. 10W of the total power budget is reserved for battery charging.

The UISP-P can also connect up to two AC adapters, each offering 100W power budgets for a total supply of 200W.

UISP-P-Pro

Two UISP-P-Pro’s outputs utilize its power budget: the DC output and lead-acid battery charger. They are prioritized in that order. 10W of the total power budget is reserved for battery charging.

The UISP-P-Pro can also connect up to (2) 240W redundant power supplies (RPS), for a total supply of 480W.

Battery Charging and Voltage

Neither Li-on nor lead-acid batteries can utilize fast charging if they are heavily discharged. They must be within their respective open-circuit voltage range:

  • UISP-P
    • Li-ion: 23.1–28.7V
    • Lead-acid: 21.2–26.5V
  • UISP-P-Pro
    • Lead-acid: 21.2–26.5V

If your battery doesn’t carry the minimum voltage, the UISP-P/UISP-P-Pro’s charger will use less than 10W to ensure that the battery is not overcharged and damaged. Conversely, if your battery surpasses the maximum voltage, the charger will use 10W or more.

Charging Scenarios

To illustrate, here is a use case to give you a sense of what charge current you can expect in certain scenarios:

UISP-P: 100W AC adapter / 20W DC output / 26V Li-ion battery

In this scenario, the remaining power budget is 80W. As such, the Li-ion charger will use 45W to charge the battery. This means the total power budget usage will be 65W (i.e., the 20W DC output + the 45W Li-ion charger).

If the DC output’s power consumption increases to 80W, the Li-ion charger will automatically reduce its charge current to 10W. After which, the total power budget usage will be 90W (i.e., the 80W DC output + the 10W Li-ion charger).

If the DC output’s consumption drops to 50W, the Li-ion charger will automatically reduce its charge current to 45W. After which, the total power budget usage will be 95W (i.e., the 50W DC output + 45W Li-ion charger).

If the DC output’s consumption increases to 95W, the Li-ion charger will stop charging.

UISP-P-Pro: 240W RPS / 100W DC output / 24V lead-acid battery

In this scenario, the remaining power budget is 140W. The lead-acid charger will use 90W to charge its battery, and the total power budget usage will be 190W (i.e., the 100W DC output + the 90W lead-acid charger).

If the DC output’s power consumption increases to 220W, the remaining power budget will be 20W and the lead-acid charger will automatically reduce its charge current to 10W. After which, the total power budget usage will be 230W (i.e., the 220W DC output + the 10W lead-acid charger).

If the DC output’s consumption drops to 200W, the remaining power budget will be 40W and the lead-acid charger will automatically increase its charge current to 30W. After which, the total power budget usage will be 230W (i.e., the 200W DC output + 30W lead-acid charger).

If the DC output’s consumption increases to 235W, the remaining power budget will be 5W and the lead-acid charger will stop charging.

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